Get a Grip on Anxiety: Effective Natural Solutions

By Michael T. Murray, N.D.

More than 20 million Americans suffer from anxiety—medically defined as ”an unpleasant emotional state ranging from mild unease to intense fear.” While fear is a rational response to danger, anxiety usually lacks a clear or realistic cause.

If you’ve never experienced anxiety or panic attacks, it’s hard to imagine just how uncomfortable they can be. More than 20 million Americans suffer from anxiety—medically defined as ”an unpleasant emotional state ranging from mild unease to intense fear.” While fear is a rational response to danger, anxiety usually lacks a clear or realistic cause. Severe anxiety will often produce panic attacks—intense feelings of fear. These attacks are most often associated with agoraphobia, an intense fear of being alone or being in public places.

The Cause Most Doctors Ignore
Both psychological stress and biochemical factors—such as caffeine and drug use—can trigger anxiety and panic attacks. Elevated levels of lactic acid in the blood is also one of the most significant biochemical factors. When the body lacks oxygen, lactate is the final product in the breakdown of blood sugar. In fact, injecting anxiety sufferers with lactate can produce severe panic attacks. In normal individuals, however, nothing happens. So it appears that individuals with anxiety may be sensitive to lactate. It stands to reason, then, that reducing lactate levels should be a priority, yet most physicians ignore this goal.

Reducing Lactate Levels
There are six nutritional factors that may be responsible for elevated lactate levels in individuals with anxiety:
1. Alcohol
2. Caffeine
3. Sugar
4. Deficiency of the B vitamins niacin, B6, and thiamin (B1)
5. Deficiency of calcium and/or magnesium
6. Food allergies
Avoiding alcohol, caffeine, sugar, and food allergens goes a long way toward relieving symptoms in people with anxiety. In fact, just eliminating coffee can, in some cases, relieve symptoms completely. In one study of four men and two women with generalized anxiety who drank 1.5–3.5 cups of coffee per day, avoiding caffeine for one week brought about significant symptom relief. The degree of improvement was so noticeable that all patients volunteered to continue abstaining from caffeine after the study.

Magnesium: The Calming Mineral
Magnesium is essential in more than 300 biochemical reactions of the human body, and a deficiency has been reported to lead to symptoms of anxiety, depression, irritability, fear, insomnia, confusion, and memory loss.
In one double-blind study, 264 people diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder were given either a placebo or 300 mg of magnesium. The magnesium group had a statistically significant reduction in symptoms. For best results, use a highly absorbable form of magnesium, such as magnesium citrate and magnesium glycinate.

Omega-3 Fats
Anxiety also appears to be linked to low levels of omega-3 fatty acids. Studies using omega-3-rich fish oils to treat anxiety have shown impressive results. In one trial, fish oil was shown to decrease anger and anxiety in substance abusers. In another, 2.5 grams daily of omega-3 fats produced a 20 percent reduction in anxiety symptoms.
Flaxseed oil, a vegetarian source of omega-3 fats, has also been shown to help ease anxiety. In one study, three out of four patients with a history of agoraphobia improved within two to three months of taking flaxseed (2–6 tbs. daily, in divided doses).

Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)
GABA is a neurotransmitter found throughout the central nervous system. Low levels or decreased GABA function in the brain is associated with anxiety, depression, insomnia, and epilepsy. In fact, many popular anti-anxiety drugs interact primarily with GABA receptors.
Significant antistress effects have been shown in clinical studies with PharmaGABA, a proprietary form of GABA. Patients given PharmaGABA reported feeling relaxed and experienced changes in brain wave patterns consistent with a state of relaxation. The typical dosage used in studies is 100-200 mg up to three times daily.

Ashwagandha
In clinical trials, Sensoril, a proprietary extract of the herb ashwagandha, has been shown to produce considerable anti-stress effects. In one double-blind human study, chronically stressed subjects taking Sensoril had significant reductions in anxiety along with positive changes in blood chemistry, adrenal hormone levels, energy levels, and feelings of wellness. A typical dosage is 125–250 mg daily.

For more information:

Stress, Anxiety and Insomnia: What the Drug Companies Won’t Tell You and Your Doctor Doesn’t Know by Michael T. Murray, N.D.

The Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine Third Edition by Michael T. Murray, N.D. and Joseph Pizzorno, N.D.

Encyclopedia of Healing Foods by Michael T. Murray, N.D. and Joseph Pizzorno, N.D. with Lara Pizzorno, M.A., L.M.T.

Michael T. Murray, N.D. is one of the world’s leading authorities on natural medicine. He has published over 30 books featuring natural approaches to health. His research into the health benefits of proper nutrition is the foundation for a best-selling line of dietary supplements from Natural Factors, where he is Director of Product Development. He is a graduate, former faculty member, and serves on the Board of Regents of Bastyr University in Seattle, Washington.

Tags: Anxiety , Articles , Natural Solutions For Anxiety , The More You Know